Category Archives: Web Science Trust News

WebScience@10 Panel Videos

Preparing for first panel debates at WebScience@10

Distinguished panel debates held at WebScience@10 are published today as standalone videos. The panels were recorded as part of our 10th anniversary celebrations held at Norton Rose Fulbright, London on 29 November 2016.

Panel 1: Bill Thompson (Chair), Professor Dame Wendy Hall (Web Science Trust), Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt (Open Data Institute), Doc Searles (independent blogger), Liz Brandt (Ctrl-Shift) and Matt McNeill (Google Cloud Platform) debate the past, present and future of trust on the Web.

Panel 2:  Professor Leslie Carr (Chair), Dr Pete Burnap (Cardiff University), Professor Dave De Roure (Oxford e-Research Centre), Professor Yi-Ke Guo (Data Science Institute), Professor Susan Halford (Web Science Institute) and Dr Jie Tang (Tsinghua-Southampton Web Science Lab) come together to discuss the achievements of Web Science research and the challenges ahead.

Highlights of 2016

Our Web Science Manifesto

For the Web to succeed, we need to understand its societal challenges including increased crime, the impact of social platforms and socio-economic discrimination, and we must work towards fairness, social inclusion, and open governance.

Wendy Hall
Professor Dame Wendy Hall, Managing Director, Web Science Trust

Jim Hendler
Professor Jim Hendler, Chair, Web Science Trust

Steffen Staab
Professor Steffen Staab, Chair, WSTNet

Web Science is even more important now than it was when the field was launched ten years ago, say Professors Dame Wendy Hall, Jim Hendler, and Steffen Staab in our Web Science Manifesto, published earlier this week at WebScience@10.

While recognising the huge influence the Web has had on our lives since its foundations were defined by Tim Berners-Lee 27 years ago, the Hall, Hendler, and Staab focus their attention on how Web Science tackles the  unforeseen social outcomes of this era-defining technical innovation. They discuss the digital divide that separates those who have and those who do not have access to the Web – the challenges we must understand to find a viable balance between data ownership and privacy protection, and between over-whelming surveillance and the prevention of terrorism.

To find out more read our Web Manifesto (pdf download).

WebScience@10

Professor Dame Wendy Hall and Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt cut the WebScience@10 cake in front of an audience celebrating 10 years of Web Science.
Professors Dame Wendy Hall and Sir Nigel Shadbolt cut the WebScience@10 cake/@dder ©2016

Last Tuesday we held WebScience@10 -celebrating 10 years of Web Science. Events were run in Berlin, London and Chicago and streamed live on our global ‘TV channel’.

Dr Asstha Madaan, Dr Ramine Tinate, Joanne Lewis, Dr Thannassis Tiropanis, and Dr Dominic DiFranzo discussing Web Observatories on WebScience@10 TV
Discussing Web Observatories on WebScience@10 TV

Over 300 delegates from industry, government and academia attended the events in person, with an additional 500 watching online, and many more following the #websci10 hashtag. Our celebration featured the exciting initiatives happening in our global network of labs, the Web Observatory, as well as debates on Trust and the Web, the role of the Web during elections, and the launch of our Web Science Manifesto.

Please contact us if you are interested in working with us to support the global development of Web Science. This could involve applying to join our network of labs (WSTNet), helping with the development of the Web Observatory, or any other projects that we showcased at WebScience@10.

Storify’s

  • Overview of the WebScience@10 activities.
  • Trust and the Web: Bill Thompson, Professor Dame Wendy Hall, Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt, Doc Searles, Liz Brandt and Matt McNeill discuss if and how we can trust the Web.
  • Web Science at the Cutting Edge: Professor Leslie Carr (Chair), Dr Pete Burnap (Cardiff University), Professor Dave De Roure (Oxford e-Research Centre), Professor Yi-Ke Guo (Data Science Institute), Professor Susan Halford (Web Science Institute) and Dr Jie Tang (Tsinghua University) discuss the latest in Web Science research.

ACM Web Science 2017 at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute https://www.flickr.com/photos/wfryer/22392839289/ Wesley Fryer ©2016 cc by https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute/ Wesley Fryer ©2016/ cc by

WebSci17 is taking place at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, New York, co-chaired by Professor Deborah L McGuinness (Tetherless World Senior Constellation Chair and Professor of Computer and Cognitive Science at RPI) and Professor Peter Fox (Tetherless World Constellation Chair and Professor of Earth and Environmental Science, Computer Science and Cognitive Science at RPI). Program Chairs are Dr Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda (GESIS) and Professor Paolo Boldi (Univ Milano).

Save the dates!

  • Notify intention to submit: 1 March 2017
  • Submit papers: 8 March 2017
  • Submit extended abstracts: 1 May 1 2017
  • Conference: 26 – 28 June 2017
  • Workshops: 25 June 2017

Brochure Celebrating 10 years of Web Science

Professor Rodney Brooks welcomes the press at the initial launch of the Web Science Research Initiative at MIT in 2006, with Tim Berners-Lee, Wendy Hall, Daniel Weitzner and Nigel Shadbolt.
2006 – Rodney Brooks with Tim Berners-Lee, Wendy Hall, Daniel Weitzner and Nigel Shadbolt at the launch of the Web Science Research Initiative.

On 11 August 2006 the academic discipline of Web Science was born with the publication of ‘Creating a Science of the Web’ in the journal Science. The paper’s authors, Tim Berners-Lee, Wendy Hall, James Hendler, Nigel Shadbolt, and Daniel Weitzner, set out their concerns about the future of the Web, and highlighted the need to establish a clear research agenda ‘aimed at understanding the current, evolving, and potential Web’. This call to action kickstarted a programme that led to the creation of the Web Science Trust, and the development of Web Science research throughout the world.

As the Web Science community comes together at  WebSci’16 (our 8th ACM conference), please download our brochure, and join us in celebrating the diversity of international multidisciplinary research that has developed over the past 10 years: A Celebration of 10 Years of the Science of the Web (5.7MB pdf).

Dame Wendy joins the “Inspiring Fifty”

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Professor Dame Wendy Hall introducing the Cross-Institute Datathon/Digichamps ©2015/cc by-nc

Web Science Trust Managing Director, Professor Dame Wendy Hall has been named one of the top most inspirational women in European technology by the Inspiring Fifty programme. Recognising Dame Wendy’s prominent global role in the development of the Semantic Web, and the academic discipline of Web Science (which celebrates it’s 10th anniversary this year), judges on the Inspiring Fifty panel acknowledged the significant part she has played in encouraging women into Science, Engineering and Technology. Dame Wendy has, they say:

“shattered many glass ceilings … to promote the role of women in SET, and acting as an important role model for others”.

In addition to her work at the WST, Dame Wendy is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southampton, and Executive Director of the Web Science Institute. One of the first computer scientists to work in ground-breaking multimedia and hypermedia research, Dame Wendy’s contribution is of international significance. She currently leads Semantic Web application research, and explores the interface between the life sciences and physical sciences.

Inventor of email Ray Tomlinson dies age 74

Tomlinson, who had earlier implemented Transmission-Control Protocol (TCP) on TENEX, a PDP-10 operating system, decided to create an e-mail system. The idea of sending messages to someone on the same computer dates back to the 1960s. Tomlinson decided that there must be an easy way to send messages between users on different computers.

He built the first e-mail system using his earlier invention, CPYNET, an early file transfer protocol program. He called that first e-mail program: SNDMSG.

See original article here.

 

WSTnet well represented in Reuters Top 100 most innovative

Reuters set out to find and rank the world’s top 100 innovative universities empirically, building a methodology that employs 10 different metrics. The criteria focused on academic papers, which indicate basic research performed at a university, and patent filings, which point to an institution’s interest in protecting and commercialising its discoveries. Compiled by the Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters, the list uses proprietary data and analysis tools.

More than 50% of our labs are in the top 100 with 4 in top 20 and 3 in the top 10.

Original article from Thomson Reuters